EL CORAZON

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The heart.

In Mexico and Latin America, it’s illegal to write a song without mentioning “el corazon.”

Si? Verdad?

Is that true?

No, not really,

I just made that up.

But every song I hear in Spanish never fails to include “corazon.” 

And porque no?

Why not?

The heart is the heart of the matter.

Have a heart.

Heartfelt.

Heartbeat.

Heartbreak.

Heart attack.

Where in the entire scheme of things is there NOT heart?

Cold-hearted.

Hard-hearted.

Tell-tale heart.

A heart of gold.

Let’s get down to the heart of things.

Open heart surgery.

Congestive heart failure.

Heart-to-heart talk.

Pulls at the heartstrings.

Makes the heart race.

Be still, my heart.

It’s the symbol for Valentine’s Day.

And a popular emoji.

Song after song after song addresses the joy and pain and longing of the heart.

If the heart weren’t so important, a zillion languages around the world wouldn’t have their own word for it.

But they do.

Coeur.

Qalb.

Cor.

Xin.

Srce.

Hjerte.

Puso.

Sydan.

Kardia.

Pu’uwai.

Dil.

Plawv.

Sziv.

Jantung.

Shinzo.

Simjang.

Coracao.

Inima.

Loto.

Wadnaha.

Moyo.

Hawci.

Kalp.

Tim.

Galon.

Inhliziyo.

Just to name a few.

The heart is mentioned throughout the Bible and the Qur’an and the Torah.

In Buddhism, the most well-known text is The Heart Sutra.

Hinduism believes the Self resides in the heart.

And that there are five dimensions to the heart:

Physical, Breath, Mental, Intelligence, and Bliss.

And then there’s the heart chakra.

In Yoga, known as the Anahata chakra.

Some people have been called heartless.

Some wear their heart on their sleeve.

My great-grandmother kept a gold locket on a fine chain around her neck.

Heart-shaped, it held a lock of hair inside and a tiny photograph of her handsome son who died at age 25 when he accidentally stepped back while repairing a wooden oil derrick and plunged 120 feet to his death.

Grief consumed the heart of his 19-year-old wife, and it would remain cold and closed her entire life–in spite of the two children–and a long second marriage–until she died of, oddly enough, heart failure.

As Carson McCullers wrote: The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter.

Tony Bennett made the song famous: “I Left My Heart in San Francisco.”

Home is where the heart is.

So have a heart.

And take care.

Read more poetry!

 

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